Dd

D = Delusion and Illusion

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D = Delusion, Deception, to deceive, to lie, occult powers.

Death

Delusion and Illusion

The political art of deception

D is for Delusion

See also: deception

de·lude

de·lude (dĭ-ldʹ) verb, transitive
de·lud·ed, de·lud·ing, de·ludes

1.     To deceive the mind or judgment of: fraudulent ads that delude consumers into sending in money. See synonyms at deceive.

2.     Obsolete. To elude or evade.

3.     Obsolete. To frustrate the hopes or plans of.

[Middle English deluden, from Latin dēlūdere : dē-, de- + lūdere, to play.]

– de·ludʹer noun
– de·ludʹing·ly adverb

deluded (adjective)

mistaken: misinformed, ill-informed, deluded, uninstructed
crazy: bedeviled, bewitched, deluded
de·lu·sion

de·lu·sion (dĭ-lʹzhən) noun

1.     a. The act or process of deluding. b. The state of being deluded.

2.     A false belief or opinion: labored under the delusion that success was at hand.

3.     Psychiatry. A false belief strongly held in spite of invalidating evidence, especially as a symptom of mental illness: delusions of persecution.

[Middle English delusioun, from Latin dēlūsiō, dēlūsiōn-, from dēlūsus past participle of dēlūdere, to delude. See delude.]

– de·luʹsion·al adjective

Deception

Also see Occult

Hindu Maya Illusion of the Ego/World

de·ceive

de·ceive (dĭ-sēvʹ) verb
de·ceived, de·ceiv·ing, de·ceives

verb, transitive

1.     To cause to believe what is not true; mislead.

2.     Archaic. To catch by guile; ensnare.
verb, intransitive
To practice deceit.

[Middle English deceiven, from Old French deceveir, from Vulgar Latin *dēcipēre, from Latin dēcipere, to ensnare, deceive : dē-, de- + capere, to seize.]

– de·ceivʹa·ble adjective
– de·ceivʹer noun
– de·ceivʹing·ly adverb

Synonyms: deceive, betray, mislead, beguile, delude, dupe, hoodwink, bamboozle, double-cross. These verbs mean to lead another into error, danger, or a disadvantageous position, for the most part by underhand means. Deceive involves the deliberate concealment or the misrepresentation of the truth: “There is a moment of difficulty and danger at which flattery and falsehood can no longer deceive” (Letters of Junius). Betray implies faithlessness or treachery: “When you betray somebody else, you also betray yourself” (Isaac Bashevis Singer). Mislead means to lead in the wrong direction or into error of thought or action: “My manhood, long misled by wandering fires,/Followed false lights” (John Dryden). Beguile suggests deceiving or misleading by means of pleasant or alluring methods: They beguiled unwary investors with tales of overnight fortunes. To delude is to mislead to the point where a person is unable to tell truth from falsehood or to form sound judgments: The government deluded the public about the dangers of low-level radiation. Dupe means to delude by playing upon another’s susceptibilities or naiveté: Gullible shoppers are easily duped by unscrupulous advertisers. Hoodwink refers to deluding by trickery: It is difficult to hoodwink a smart lawyer. Bamboozle less formally means to delude by the use of such tactics as hoaxing, befuddling, or artful persuasion: “Perhaps if I wanted to be understood or to understand I would bamboozle myself into belief, but I am a reporter” (Graham Greene). Double-cross implies the betrayal of a confidence or the willful breaking of a pledge: New members of the party felt they had been double-crossed by the old guard.

de·cep·tion

de·cep·tion (dĭ-sĕpʹshən) noun

1.     The use of deceit.

2.     The fact or state of being deceived.

3.     A ruse; a trick.

[Middle English decepcioun, from Old French deception, from Late Latin dēceptiō, dēceptiōn-, from Latin dēceptus past participle of dēcipere, to deceive. See deceive.]

e·go

e·go (ēʹgō, ĕgʹō) noun
plural e·gos

1.     The self, especially as distinct from the world and other selves.

2.     In psychoanalysis, the division of the psyche that is conscious, most immediately controls thought and behavior, and is most in touch with external reality.

3.     a. An exaggerated sense of self-importance; conceit. b. Appropriate pride in oneself; self-esteem.

[New Latin, from Latin, I.]

PSYCHOLOGY

Ego

Ego, in psychoanalysis, term denoting the central part of the personality structure that deals with reality and is influenced by social forces. According to Austrian psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud, the ego constitutes one of the three basic provinces of the mind, the others being the id and the superego. The ego, which begins forming at birth in the first encounters with the external world, learns to modify behavior by mediating between unconscious impulses and acquired social and personal standards.

PSYCHOLOGY

Superego

Superego, in psychoanalytic theory, one of the three basic constituents of the mind, the others being the id and the ego. As postulated by Austrian psychoanalyist Sigmund Freud, the superego automatically modifies and inhibits those instinctual impulses that tend to produce antisocial actions and thoughts. The superego develops as the child gradually and unconsciously adopts parental and social values and standards.

Deception

de·cep·tion

de·cep·tion (dĭ-sĕpʹshən) noun

1.     The use of deceit.

2.     The fact or state of being deceived.

3.     A ruse; a trick.

[Middle English decepcioun, from Old French deception, from Late Latin dēceptiō, dēceptiōn-, from Latin dēceptus past participle of dēcipere, to deceive. See deceive.]

de·ceit

de·ceit (dĭ-sētʹ) noun

1.     The act or practice of deceiving; deception.

2.     A stratagem; a trick.

3.     The quality of being deceitful; falseness.

[Middle English deceite, from Old French from past participle of deceveir, to deceive. See deceive.]

de·ceive

de·ceive (dĭ-sēvʹ) verb
de·ceived, de·ceiv·ing, de·ceives

verb, transitive

1.     To cause to believe what is not true; mislead.

2.     Archaic. To catch by guile; ensnare.
verb, intransitive
To practice deceit.

[Middle English deceiven, from Old French deceveir, from Vulgar Latin *dēcipēre, from Latin dēcipere, to ensnare, deceive : dē-, de- + capere, to seize.]

– de·ceivʹa·ble adjective
– de·ceivʹer noun
– de·ceivʹing·ly adverb

Synonyms: deceive, betray, mislead, beguile, delude, dupe, hoodwink, bamboozle, double-cross. These verbs mean to lead another into error, danger, or a disadvantageous position, for the most part by underhand means. Deceive involves the deliberate concealment or the misrepresentation of the truth: “There is a moment of difficulty and danger at which flattery and falsehood can no longer deceive” (Letters of Junius). Betray implies faithlessness or treachery: “When you betray somebody else, you also betray yourself” (Isaac Bashevis Singer). Mislead means to lead in the wrong direction or into error of thought or action: “My manhood, long misled by wandering fires,/Followed false lights” (John Dryden). Beguile suggests deceiving or misleading by means of pleasant or alluring methods: They beguiled unwary investors with tales of overnight fortunes. To delude is to mislead to the point where a person is unable to tell truth from falsehood or to form sound judgments: The government deluded the public about the dangers of low-level radiation. Dupe means to delude by playing upon another’s susceptibilities or naiveté: Gullible shoppers are easily duped by unscrupulous advertisers. Hoodwink refers to deluding by trickery: It is difficult to hoodwink a smart lawyer. Bamboozle less formally means to delude by the use of such tactics as hoaxing, befuddling, or artful persuasion: “Perhaps if I wanted to be understood or to understand I would bamboozle myself into belief, but I am a reporter” (Graham Greene). Double-cross implies the betrayal of a confidence or the willful breaking of a pledge: New members of the party felt they had been double-crossed by the old guard.

deception (noun)

deception, kidding, tongue in cheek
circumvention, outwitting
self-deception, wishful thinking, credulity
infatuation, folly
fallacy, sophistry
illusion, delusion, hallucination, error
deceptiveness, speciousness, latency trap
false appearance, mockery, mirage, will-o’-the-wisp, visual fallacy
show, false show, outward show, meretriciousness, paint sham
false reputation, feet of clay
hollowness, bubble, insubstantiality
falseness, deceit, quackery, imposture, false pretenses, lie, falsehood
deceitfulness, guile, craft, artfulness, cunning
hypocrisy, insincerity, phoniness, duplicity
treachery, betrayal, perfidy
machination, hanky-panky, monkey business, wheeling and dealing, collusion, plot
fraudulence, cozenage, cheating, cheat, diddling
cheat, deceiver

Other Forms
insubstantiality: hallucination, self-delusion, deception
visual fallacy: illusion, optical illusion, trick of light, trick of the eyesight, phantasm, phantasmagoria, fata morgana, hallucination, mirage, deception
misjudgment: autosuggestion, self-deception, self-delusion, wishful thinking, deception
concealment: disguisement, disguise, camouflage, deception
disguise: disguise, blind, charade, masquerade, deception
falsehood: faking, forgery, falsification, deception
cunning: cheating, monkey business, circumvention, deception
stratagem: cheat, deception
borrowing: borrowed plumes, deception
peculation: confidence game, skin game, deception
pretension: artifice, sham, humbug, quackery, charlatanism, charlatanry, fraud, deception
ostentation: insincerity, lip service, tokenism, deception
boast: bluff, bounce, deception

Ego

See also: Motivation, Self-determination, automaton

e·go

e·go (ēʹgō, ĕgʹō) noun
plural e·gos

1.     The self, especially as distinct from the world and other selves.

2.     In psychoanalysis, the division of the psyche that is conscious, most immediately controls thought and behavior, and is most in touch with external reality.

3.     a. An exaggerated sense of self-importance; conceit. b. Appropriate pride in oneself; self-esteem.

[New Latin, from Latin, I.]

PSYCHOLOGY

Ego

Ego, in psychoanalysis, term denoting the central part of the personality structure that deals with reality and is influenced by social forces. According to Austrian psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud, the ego constitutes one of the three basic provinces of the mind, the others being the id and the superego. The ego, which begins forming at birth in the first encounters with the external world, learns to modify behavior by mediating between unconscious impulses and acquired social and personal standards.

ego (noun)

intrinsicality: ego, personality, self
self: self, ego, id, identity, selfhood, personality, subjectivity
subjectivity: ego, id, superego
spirit: psyche, pneuma, id, ego, superego, animus, anima, self, subliminal self, the unconscious, the subconscious

de·sire

de·sire (dĭ-zīrʹ) verb, transitive
de·sired, de·sir·ing, de·sires

1.     To wish or long for; want.

2.     To express a wish for; request.
noun

1.     A wish or longing.

2.     A request or petition.

3.     The object of longing: My greatest desire is to go back home.

4.     Sexual appetite; passion.

[Middle English desiren, from Old French desirer, from Latin dēsīderāre : dē-, de- + sīdus, sīder-, star.]

– de·sirʹer noun

Synonyms: desire, covet, crave, want, wish. The central meaning shared by these verbs is “to have a strong longing for”: desire peace; coveted the new convertible; craving fame and fortune; wanted a drink of water; got all she wished.

desire (noun)

desire, wish, will and pleasure, will
summons, call, cry, command
dun, demand
desideration, wanting, want, need, exigency, requirement
claim, dueness
desiderium, nostalgia, homesickness, regret
wistfulness, longing, hankering, yearning, pining, sheep’s eyes
wishing, thinking, daydreaming, daydream, castles in the air, fantasy
ambition, aspiration, hope
appetence, yen, urge, impulse
cacoëthes, itch
thrill-seeking, rubber-necking, curiousness, thirst for knowledge, intellectual curiosity, curiosity
avidity, eagerness, zeal, willingness
passion, ardor, warmth, impetuosity, impatience, excitability
rage, fury, frenzy
monomania, mania, personality disorder
craving, lust for, appetite, hunger, thirst, hungry look hunger
land-hunger, expansionism, a place in the sun
covetousness, cupidity, itching palm, avarice
graspingness, greediness, greed, rapacity
voracity, wolfishness, insatiability, gluttony
concupiscence, lust libido
inordinate desire, incontinence, intemperance

Other Forms
attraction: itch, itch for, desire
overstepping: expansionism, greediness, desire
expectation: eager expectation, anxious expectation, sanguine expectation, desire
fantasy: window-shopping, make-believe, vaporware, golden dream, pipe dream, vain hope, desire
will: appetence, desire
motive: ambition, desire
intention: ambition, desire
request: wish, want, desire
avarice: rapacity, avidity, greed, desire
suffering: longing, homesickness, nostalgia, desire
regret: longing, desiderium, homesickness, maladie du pays, nostalgia, nostalgie de la boue, desire
desired object: desired object, one’s desire, one’s heart’s desire, wish, desire, desirable thing, desideratum, requirement
love: lovesickness, Cupid’s sting, yearning, longing, desire
envy: envy, envious eye, enviousness, covetousness, desire

need

need (nēd) noun

1.     A lack of something required or desirable: crops in need of water; a need for affection.

2.     Something required or wanted; a requisite: Our needs are modest.

3.     Necessity; obligation: There is no need for you to go.

4.     A condition of poverty or misfortune: The family is in dire need.
verb
need·ed, need·ing, needs

auxiliary
To be under the necessity of or the obligation to: They need not come.

verb, transitive
To have need of; require: The family needs money.

verb, intransitive

1.     To be in need or want.

2.     To be necessary.

[Middle English nede, from Old English nēod, nēd, distress, necessity.]

Synonyms: need, necessity, exigency, requisite. These nouns denote a condition in which something essential is required or wanted; they also refer to that which is required or wanted. Need is the most general: There’s no need to be concerned. She is serene and contented; her emotional and spiritual needs are being met. Necessity more strongly than need suggests urgency, inevitability, or unavoidable obligation: “I think the necessity of being ready increases.-Look to it” (Abraham Lincoln). “The rehabilitation of the cabin became a necessity” (Bret Harte). Exigency implies acute urgency, especially that arising from conditions or circumstances such as those of an emergency: “No . . . more pernicious[doctrine]was ever invented . . . than that any of [the Constitution’s] provisions can be suspended during any of the great exigencies of government” (David Davis) Requisite applies to something indispensable: “a place where the three grand requisites of water, fuel and fodder were to be obtained” (James Fenimore Cooper). See also synonyms at lack.

Usage Note: Depending on the sense, the verb need behaves sometimes like an auxiliary verb (such as can or may) and sometimes like a main verb (such as want or try). When used as a main verb, need agrees with its subject, takes to before the verb following it, and combines with do in questions, negations, and certain other constructions: He needs to go. Does he need to go so soon? He doesn’t need to go. When used as an auxiliary verb, need does not agree with its subject, does not take to before the verb following it, and does not combine with do: He needn’t go. Need he go so soon? The auxiliary forms of need are used primarily in present-tense questions, negations, and conditional clauses. They differ subtly in meaning from the main verb forms in that they always refer to an externally imposed obligation. Hence one might say You needn’t (or less formally, don’t need to) fill out both forms, but where the sense of necessity is internal to the subject, only the main verb can be used: I don’t need to (not needn’t) be told how to manage my own affairs. Note also that the use of need as an auxiliary is often accompanied by a presupposition that the activity in question has in fact been performed. The boys needn’t have spoken frankly implies that they did in fact speak frankly, whereas the sentence The boys did not need to speak frankly does not; only the latter could be followed by a clause like they conveyed their meanings by indirection.

need (noun)

deficit: want, lack, need, requirement
shortfall: something missing, want, lack, need, requirement
requirement: desideratum, want, lack, need, insufficiency
scarcity: lack, want, need, needfulness
adversity: broken fortune, want, need, distress, extremity, poverty
poverty: privation, indigence, neediness, necessitousness, necessity, dire necessity, need, want, pinch, requirement
desire: desideration, wanting, want, need, exigency, requirement

sur·viv·al

sur·viv·al (sər-vīʹvəl) noun

1.     a. The act or process of surviving. b. The fact of having survived.

2.     Something, such as an ancient custom or belief, that has survived.
noun, attributive.
Often used to modify another noun: survival techniques; survival equipment.

sur·vive

sur·vive (sər-vīvʹ) verb
sur·vived, sur·viv·ing, sur·vives

verb, intransitive
To remain alive or in existence.

verb, transitive

1.     To live longer than; outlive: She survived her husband by five years.

2.     To live or persist through: plants that can survive frosts. See synonyms at outlive.

[Middle English surviven, from Old French sourvivre, from Latin supervīvere : super-, super- + vīvere, to live.]

– sur·viʹvor noun

survival of the fittest

survival of the fittest (sər-vĪʹvəl ŭv thē fĭtʹĭst) noun
Natural selection conceived of as a struggle for life in which only those organisms best adapted to existing conditions are able to survive and reproduce.

cus·tom

cus·tom (kŭsʹtəm) noun

1.     A practice followed by people of a particular group or region.

2.     A habitual practice of a person: my custom of reading a little before sleep. See synonyms at habit.

3.     Law. A common tradition or usage so long established that it has the force or validity of law.

4.     a. Habitual patronage, as of a store. b. Habitual customers; patrons.

5.     customs
(used with a sing. verb ) a. A duty or tax imposed on imported and, less commonly, exported goods. b. The governmental agency authorized to collect these duties. c. The procedure for inspecting goods and baggage entering a country.

6.     Tribute, service, or rent paid by a feudal tenant to a lord.
adjective

1.     Made to order.

2.     Specializing in the making or selling of made-to-order goods: a custom tailor.

[Middle English custume, from Old French costume, from Latin cōnsuētūdō, cōnsuētūdin-, from cōnsuētus past participle of cōnsuēscere, to accustom : com-, intensive pref.. See com- + suēscere, to become accustomed.]

au·tom·a·ton

au·tom·a·ton (ô-tŏmʹə-tən, -tŏn´) noun
plural au·tom·a·tons or au·tom·a·ta (-tə)

1.     A self-operating machine or mechanism, especially a robot.

2.     One that behaves or responds in a mechanical way.

[Latin, self-operating machine, from Greek from neuter of automatos, self-acting. See automatic.]

– au·tomʹa·tous adjective

automaton (noun)

image: robot, android, automaton
fatalist: pawn, tool, zombie, automaton, robot, machine
machine: robot, automaton
self-de·ter·mi·na·tion

self-de·ter·mi·na·tion (sĕlf´dĭ-tûr´mə-nāʹshən) noun

1.     Determination of one’s own fate or course of action without compulsion; free will.

2.     Freedom of the people of a given area to determine their own political status; independence.

Self-delusion (noun)

insubstantiality: hallucination, self-delusion, deception
misjudgment: autosuggestion, self-deception, self-delusion, wishful thinking, deception
credulity: self-delusion, self-deception, wishful thinking, misjudgment
self

self (sĕlf) noun
plural selves (sĕlvz)

1.     The total, essential, or particular being of a person; the individual: “An actor’s instrument is the self” (Joan Juliet Buck).

2.     The essential qualities distinguishing one person from another; individuality: “He would walk a little first along the southern walls, shed his European self, fully enter this world” (Howard Kaplan).

3.     One’s consciousness of one’s own being or identity; the ego: “For some of us, the self’s natural doubts are given in mesmerizing amplification by way of critics’ negative assessments of our writing” (Joyce Carol Oates).

4.     One’s own interests, welfare, or advantage: thinking of self alone.

5.     Immunology. That which the immune system identifies as belonging to the body: tissues no longer recognized as self.
pron.
Myself, yourself, himself, or herself: a living wage for self and family.

adjective

1.     Of the same character throughout.

2.     Of the same material as the article with which it is used: a dress with a self belt.

3.     Obsolete. Same or identical.

[Middle English, selfsame, from Old English.]

an·i·ma

an·i·ma (ănʹə-mə) noun

1.     The inner self of an individual; the soul.

2.     In Jungian psychology: a. The unconscious or true inner self of an individual, as opposed to the persona, or outer aspect of the personality. b. The feminine inner personality, as present in the unconscious of the male. It is in contrast to the animus, which represents masculine characteristics.

[Latin anima.]

an·i·ma·tion

an·i·ma·tion (ăn´ə-māʹshən) noun

1.     The act, process, or result of imparting life, interest, spirit, motion, or activity.

2.     The quality or condition of being alive, active, spirited, or vigorous.

3.     a. The art or process of preparing animated cartoons. b. An animated cartoon.

dem·i·urge

dem·i·urge (dĕmʹē-ûrj´) noun

1.     A powerful creative force or personality.

2.     A public magistrate in some ancient Greek states.

3.     Demiurge A deity in Gnosticism, Manicheeism, and other religions who creates the material world and is sometimes viewed as the originator of evil.

4.     Demiurge A Platonic deity who orders or fashions the material world out of chaos.

[Late Latin dēmiurgus, from Greek dēmiourgos, artisan : dēmios, public (from dēmos, people) + ergos, worker (from ergon, work).]

– dem´i·urʹgeous (-ûrʹjəs) or dem´i·urʹgic (-jĭk), dem´i·urʹgi·cal (-jĭ-kəl) adjective
– dem´i·urʹgi·cal·ly adverb

Indoctrination

in·doc·tri·nate

in·doc·tri·nate (ĭn-dŏkʹtrə-nāt´) verb, transitive
in·doc·tri·nat·ed, in·doc·tri·nat·ing, in·doc·tri·nates

1.     a. To instruct in a body of doctrine or principles. b. To initiate by means of doctrinal instruction: indoctrinate new members into the party.

2.     To imbue with a partisan or ideological point of view: a generation of children who had been indoctrinated against the values of their parents.

– in·doc´tri·naʹtion noun

indoctrination (noun)

teaching: inculcation, catechization, indoctrination, preaching, sermonizing, homiletics
habituation: habituation, training, indoctrination, teaching
Motivation

mo·ti·vate

mo·ti·vate (mōʹtə-vāt´) verb, transitive
mo·ti·vat·ed, mo·ti·vat·ing, mo·ti·vate
To provide with an incentive; move to action; impel.

– moʹti·va´tor noun

mo·ti·va·tion

mo·ti·va·tion (mō´tə-vāʹshən) noun

1.     a. The act or process of motivating. b. The state of being motivated.

2.     Something that motivates; an inducement or incentive.

– mo´ti·vaʹtion·al adjective
– mo´ti·vaʹtion·al·ly adverb

motivational research

motivational research (mŌ´tə-vĀʹshə-nəl rĭ-sûrchʹ) noun
Systematic analysis of the motives behind consumer decisions, used especially by advertisers and marketers to assess attitudes toward products and services. Also called motivation research.

ECONOMICS & BUSINESS

Advertising

Advertising, collective term for public announcements that promote the sale of specific commodities or services. Advertising techniques range from the publishing of simple, straightforward notices in the classified-advertising columns of newspapers to the broad, concerted use of newspapers, magazines, television, radio, direct mail, and other communications media.

Advertising messages are spread through numerous and varied channels or media. The major media in the United States are newspapers, television, direct mail, radio, magazines, business publications, outdoor and transit advertising, and farm publications. In addition, a significant amount of advertising dollars are invested in miscellaneous media, such as window displays, free shopping-news publications, calendars, skywriting by airplanes, and even sandwich boards carried by people walking the streets.

Research
Newspapers and magazines go to great lengths to analyze their readers to show where they live, their income, education, recreational habits, age, and number of children and to provide other guides to determining their susceptibility to certain classes of products. Radio and television stations and networks similarly analyze their audiences for the guidance of advertisers. The whole field of audience research is complex and controversial. Researchers have found it necessary to refine their techniques consistently and make them increasingly reliable.

One major type of research project is the survey of test markets. Advertisers and agencies conduct extensive surveys to determine the potential acceptance of products or services before they are advertised nationally at costs that may amount to millions of dollars. In one common procedure, the advertising-marketing division of a company dispatches a crew of surveyors to do a door-to-door canvass in various neighborhoods differing in average income levels. Householders are shown various versions of the product intended for market. If the survey convinces the manufacturer that one of the versions exhibited will attract enough purchasers, a crew then pretests various sales appeals by showing proposed advertisements to consumers and asking them to indicate their preference. After the one or two best-liked advertisements or basic appeals are determined, the advertiser produces a limited quantity of the new product and introduces it in a test market. On the basis of this market test, the advertiser-manufacturer makes a decision as to whether a national campaign should be launched.

Techniques of Persuasion
The basic appeals that advertising makes to consumers are the prospects of more money and better jobs, security against the hazards of old age and illness, popularity and personal prestige, praise from others, more comfort, increased enjoyment, social advancement, improved appearance, and better health. One fundamental technique, apparent in the earliest applications of advertising and still basic in the most modern procedures, is repetition: A typical national advertiser captures the attention of prospective customers by repeated appeals to buy. Another basic persuader is the trademark, a two- or three-dimensional insignia symbolizing a company or industry. Manufacturers have spent millions to establish their trademarks as symbols of reliability and value. Once consumers gain confidence in it, the owner can use it as a device to reassure customers that all products bearing this symbol are reliable. Price appeal probably motivates more decisions to buy than any other appeal, and the words sale and bargain are directed at consumers with great frequency.

Structure and Regulation of the Industry
A typical major advertising agency employs advertising and marketing specialists, designers, writers, artists, economists, psychologists, researchers, media analysts, product testers, librarians, accountants and bookkeepers, and mathematicians. An important group of people, making up the traffic department, follow and expedite the work from start to finish. The advertiser tells the agency what product or service is to be sold and at what price. The agency then creates and produces the advertising and recommends the budget, the media to be used, and the scheduling of the various parts of the campaign. It also purchases space and time in various media for the advertiser.

Before the advertising industry became well organized, the unethical practices of some advertisers prompted many laws and legal restrictions by the federal, state, and municipal governments. At present, advertising is one of the most strictly regulated industries in the United States. An overlapping of authority exists among various federal bureaus, and in some instances one or more governmental bodies attempt to enforce conflicting regulations. State laws and enforcement bureaus may impose additional regulations on certain types of advertising. In some states, the media are themselves regulated. For example, outdoor billboard advertising is banned in certain states. Despite, or possibly because of, such widespread legal curbs, the advertising industry has resorted to self-regulation in an effort to stop abuses before they occur. These self-imposed codes of ethics and procedures aim to curtail not only bad taste but also misrepresentation and deception in copy and illustrations, as well as derogatory and unfair representations of products of competitors.

History
One of the first known methods of advertising was the outdoor display, usually an eye-catching sign painted on the wall of a building. Archaeologists have uncovered many such signs, notably in the ruins of ancient Rome and Pompeii. In the Middle Ages (5th century to 15th century), the use of so-called town criers developed. The criers were citizens who read public notices aloud and were also employed by merchants to shout the praises of their wares. Printed advertising made little headway until the invention of the movable-type printing press in Europe about 1440. The trademark dates from about the 16th century, when tradespeople and guild members posted characteristic symbols outside their shops.

In the early stages of American advertising, direct advertising was most effective, because the nation lacked transcontinental transportation, distribution, and communications systems. The pioneers in this field were seed companies and book and pamphlet publishers. Mail-order houses appeared on the scene as early as the 1870s. Railroads and steamship lines also were among the early users of advertising in the United States, not only to praise the luxury and comfort of their modes of travel but also to publish their schedules and rates.

Late in the 19th century many American firms began to market packaged goods under brand names. Previously, such everyday household products as sugar, soap, rice, and molasses had been sold in neighborhood stores from large bulk containers. As a result, consumers had seldom been aware of, or influenced by, brand names. Soapmakers were early advertisers of packaged and branded products. The first “household name” soap brands, which date from about 1880, include Ivory, Pears’, Sapolio, Colgate, Kirk’s American Family, and Packer’s. Shortly after the turn of the century, Americans began to be aware of such brand names as Bon Ami, Wrigley, and Coca-Cola.

After World War I (1914-1918), advertising developed into a business so big that it became almost a trademark of America itself in the eyes of the world. The increased use of electricity led to the illuminated outdoor poster; photoengraving and other modern printing inventions helped both the editorial and advertising departments of printed journals. The advent of radio in the 1920s stimulated a whole new technique of selling by voice. The most significant development after World War II (1939-1945) was television, a medium that forced the advertising industry to better its techniques of selling by the use of visual devices as well as by voice.

mo·tive

mo·tive (mōʹtĭv) noun

1.     An emotion, desire, physiological need, or similar impulse that acts as an incitement to action.

2.     (mōʹtĭv, mō-tēvʹ) A motif in art, literature, or music.
adjective

1.     Causing or able to cause motion: motive power.

2.     Impelling to action: motive pleas.

3.     Of or constituting an incitement to action.
verb, transitive
mo·tived, mo·tiv·ing, mo·tives
To motivate.

[Middle English motif, motive, from Old French motif, from Late Latin mōtīvus, of motion, from Latin mōtus past participle of movēre, to move.]

motivate (verb)

motivate, motive, move, actuate, manipulate, operate
work upon, play upon, act upon, operate upon, influence
weigh, count, be a consideration, sway, prevail
call the tune, override, predominate
work on the feelings, appeal, challenge, shame into incite
infect, inject with, infuse into, educate
interest, intrigue, impress
charm, fascinate, captivate, hypnotize, spellbind, bewitch
turn on
pull, attract
push, impel
force, enforce, compel
bend, incline, dispose
predispose, prejudice, bias
predestine, predetermine
lead, direct, manage
lead astray, mislead
give a lead, set the fashion, be a trend-setter, set an example, set the pace, precede

Other Forms
cause: occasion, give occasion for, motivate
influence: put pressure on, lobby, pull strings, pull the strings, motivate
propound: put an idea into one’s head, urge, motivate
induce: carry one’s point, prevail upon, talk into, push into, drive into, nag into, bully into, browbeat motivate
be important: be important, matter, be a consideration, bulk large, motivate
dispose of: call into play, set in motion, set in action, set going, deploy, motivate
do: manipulate, motivate
make quarrels: egg on, incite, motivate
cause desire: cause desire, incline, motivate

in·cen·tive

in·cen·tive (ĭn-sĕnʹtĭv) noun
Something, such as the fear of punishment or the expectation of reward, that induces action or motivates effort.

adjective
Serving to induce or motivate: an incentive bonus for high productivity.

[Middle English, from Late Latin incentīvum from neuter of incentīvus, inciting, from Latin, setting the tune, from incentus past participle of incinere, to sound : in-, intensive pref.. See in-2 + canere, to sing.]

in·cen·tiv·ize

in·cen·tiv·ize (ĭn-sĕnʹtə-vīz´) verb, transitive
in·cen·tiv·ized, in·cen·tiv·iz·ing, in·cen·tiv·iz·es
Usage Problem.
To offer incentives or an incentive to; motivate: “This bill will help incentivize everybody to solve that part of the problem” (Richard A. Gephardt). See Usage Note at -ize.

in·duce

in·duce (ĭn-dsʹ, -dysʹ) verb, transitive
in·duced, in·duc·ing, in·duc·es

1.     To lead or move, as to a course of action, by influence or persuasion. See synonyms at persuade.

2.     To bring about or stimulate the occurrence of; cause: a drug used to induce labor.

3.     To infer by inductive reasoning.

4.     Physics. a. To produce (an electric current or a magnetic charge) by induction. b. To produce (radioactivity, for example) artificially by bombardment of a substance with neutrons, gamma rays, and other particles.

5.     Biochemistry. To initiate or increase the production of (an enzyme or other protein) at the level of genetic transcription.

[Middle English inducen, from Old French inducer, from Latin indūcere : in-, in. See in-2 + dūcere, to lead.]

– in·ducʹi·ble adjective

in·duce·ment

in·duce·ment (ĭn-dsʹmənt, -dysʹ-) noun

1.     Something that helps bring about an action or a desired result; an incentive: tax breaks intended as an inducement to greater reinvestment.

2.     The act or process of inducing: inducement of sleep.

3.     Law. An introductory or background statement explaining the main allegations in a proceeding.

inducement (noun)

inducement, pressure, instancy, urgency, press, insistence
lobbying, influence
indirect influence, side pressure
provocation, urging, incitement, encouragement, incitation, instigation, prompting, inspiration, excitation
support, abetment, aid
solicitation, invitation, request
temptation, enticement, carrot, allurement, seduction, seductiveness, tantalization, witchery, bewitchment, fascination, charm, sex appeal, it, attractiveness, magnetism, attraction
cajolery, blandishment, flattery
coaxing, teasing, wheedling, endearment
persuasion, persuasiveness, salesmanship, sales talk, patter, eloquence
pep talk, trumpet call, rallying cry, call
exhortation, lecture
pleading, advocacy, advice
propaganda, agitprop
advertising, sales promotion, soft sell, hard sell, advertisement
promises, election promises
bribery, bribery and corruption, graft, payola, palm-greasing, back-scratching, reward
castigation, tongue-lashing
honeyed words, siren song, voice of the devil, winning ways

Other Forms
conversion: evangelization, proselytization, teaching, inducement
causation: temptation, inducement
influence: lobby, pressure group, vested interest, inducement
attraction: allurement, seduction, temptation, lure, bait, decoy, charm, siren song, inducement
inattention: diversion, distraction, dust in the eyes, wild-goose chase, red herring, inducement
incentive: incentive, inducement
cooperation: connivance, collusion, abetment, inducement
offer: improper offer, bribery, bribe, greased palm, inducement
gift: bribe, sweetener, douceur, slush fund, inducement
trade: tied aid, dollar diplomacy, inducement
purchase: buying over, bribery, inducement
excitation: encouragement, animation, incitement, invitation, appeal, inducement
courage: fresh courage, new heart, encouragement, animation, inducement
liking: fascination, allurement, attraction, temptation, titillation, seduction, inducement
sorcery: sympathetic magic, influence, inducement

per·suade

per·suade (pər-swādʹ) verb, transitive
per·suad·ed, per·suad·ing, per·suades
To induce to undertake a course of action or embrace a point of view by means of argument, reasoning, or entreaty: “to make children fit to live in a society by persuading them to learn and accept its codes” (Alan W. Watts). See Usage Note at convince.

[Latin persuādēre : per-, per- + suādēre, to urge.]

– per·suadʹa·ble adjective
– per·suadʹer noun

Synonyms: persuade, induce, prevail, convince. These verbs are compared as they mean to succeed in causing a person to do or consent to something. Persuade means to win someone over, as by reasons, advice, urging, or personal forcefulness: Nothing can persuade her to change her mind once it is made up. To induce is to lead, as to a course of action, by means of influence or persuasion: “Pray what could induce him to commit so rash an action?” (Oliver Goldsmith). One prevails on somebody who resists: “He had prevailed upon the king to spare them” (Daniel Defoe). To convince is to persuade by the use of argument or evidence: “In science the credit goes to the man who convinces the world, not to the man to whom the idea first occurs” (Francis Darwin).

persuade (verb)

influence: urge, prompt, tempt, incite, inspire, dispose, persuade, prevail upon, convince, carry away, induce
make certain: remove doubt, persuade, convince
convince: convince, make believe, assure, persuade, satisfy
induce: persuade, move to action, carry with one, convince
request: urge, persuade, induce

per·sua·sion

per·sua·sion (pər-swāʹzhən) noun

1.     The act of persuading or the state of being persuaded: “The persuasion of a democracy to big changes is at best a slow process” (Harold J. Laski).

2.     The ability or power to persuade: “Three foremost aids to persuasion which occur to me are humility, concentration, and gusto” (Marianne Moore).

3.     A strongly held opinion; a conviction. See synonyms at opinion.

4.     a. A body of religious beliefs; a religion: worshipers of various persuasions. b. A party, faction, or group holding to a particular set of ideas or beliefs.

5.     Informal. Kind; sort.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin persuāsiō, persuāsiōn-, from persuāsus past participle of persuādēre, to persuade. See persuade.]

an·i·ma·tion

an·i·ma·tion (ăn´ə-māʹshən) noun

1.     The act, process, or result of imparting life, interest, spirit, motion, or activity.

2.     The quality or condition of being alive, active, spirited, or vigorous.

3.     a. The art or process of preparing animated cartoons. b. An animated cartoon.

life (noun)

life, living, being alive, animate existence, being, existence
the living, living and breathing world
living being, being, soul, spirit
plant life, vegetable life
animal life, animality
human life, humankind
gift of life, birth, nativity, origin
new birth, rejuvenation, revivification, renaissance, revival
life to come, the hereafter, future state
immortal life, heaven
vivification, vitalization, animation
vitality, vital force, vital principle, élan vital, life force
soul, spirit
beating heart, strong pulse
will to live, hold on life, survival, cat’s nine lives, longevity, long duration
animal spirits, liveliness, animation, moral sensibility
wind, breath, breathing, respiration
vital air, breath of life, breath of one’s nostrils
lifeblood, essential part
vital spark, vital flame
heart, artery
vital necessity, nourishment, staff of life, food
biological function, parenthood, motherhood, fatherhood, propagation
sex, sexual activity, coition
living matter, protoplasm, bioplasm, ectoplasm, tissue, living tissue
macromolecule, bioplast
cell, unicellular organism, organism
cooperative living, symbiosis, association
life-support system
lifetime, one’s born days
life expectancy, life span, life cycle
capacity for life, survivability, viability, viableness, possibility

Other Forms
existence: subsistence, life
substance: body, flesh and blood, living matter, life
essential part: life, lifeblood, sap
time: the whole time, the entire period, life, lifetime
period: life, lifetime, life sentence
affairs: world, life, situation, circumstance
vitality: vim, vigor, liveliness, life
vigorousness: vigorousness, lustiness, energy, vigor, life, activity
blood: lifeblood, life
organism: living matter, life
biography: life, curriculum vitae, cv, résumé, life story or history
vocation: life, lifestyle, walk of life, career, chosen career, labor of love, self-imposed task, voluntary work
activity: life, stir, motion
restlessness: vivacity, spirit, animation, liveliness, vitality, life
cheerfulness: vitality, spirits, animal spirits, high spirits, youthful high spirits, joie de vivre, life

Power

power behind the throne (noun)

cause: hidden hand, hidden cause, power behind the throne, undercurrents, influence
influence: secret influence, hand that rocks the cradle, woman behind the man, power behind the throne, kingmaker, power broker, latency
latency: manipulator, puppeteer, hidden hand, wire-puller, strings, friends in high places, power behind the throne, éminence grise, influence
authority: vicarious authority, power behind the throne, influence
deputy: alter ego, power behind the throne, éminence grise, motivator
pow·er

pow·er (pouʹər) noun
Abbr. pwr.

1.     The ability or capacity to perform or act effectively.

2.     Often powers A specific capacity, faculty, or aptitude: her powers of concentration.

3.     Strength or force exerted or capable of being exerted; might. See synonyms at strength.

4.     The ability or official capacity to exercise control; authority.

5.     A person, group, or nation having great influence or control over others: the western powers.

6.     The might of a nation, political organization, or similar group.

8.     Chiefly Upper Southern U.S.. A large number or amount. See Regional Note at powerful.

9.     a. The energy or motive force by which a physical system or machine is operated: turbines turned by steam power; a sailing ship driven by wind power. b. The capacity of a system or machine to operate: a vehicle that runs under its own power. c. Electrical or mechanical energy, especially as used to assist or replace human energy. d. Electricity supplied to a home, building, or community: a storm that cut off power to the whole region.

10.   Physics. The rate at which work is done, expressed as the amount of work per unit time and commonly measured in units such as the watt and horsepower.

11.   Electricity. a. The product of applied potential difference and current in a direct-current circuit. b. The product of the effective values of the voltage and current with the cosine of the phase angle between current and voltage in an alternating-current circuit.

12.   Mathematics. a. See exponent. b. The number of elements in a finite set.

13.   Statistics. The probability of rejecting the null hypothesis where it is false.

14.   A measure of the magnification of an optical instrument, such as a microscope or telescope.

15.   powers Theology. The sixth of the nine orders of angels.

16.   Archaic. An armed force.
adjective

1.     Of or relating to political, social, or economic control: a power struggle; a power base.

2.     Operated with mechanical or electrical energy in place of bodily exertion: a power tool; power car windows.

3.     Of or relating to the generation or transmission of electricity: power companies; power lines.

4.     Informal. Of or relating to influential business or professional practices: a pinstriped suit with a power tie; met with high-level executives at a power breakfast.
verb, transitive
pow·ered, pow·er·ing, pow·ers
To supply with power, especially mechanical power.

idiom.
powers that be
Those who hold effective power in a system or situation: a plan vetoed by the powers that be.

[Middle English, from Old French poeir, to be able, power, from Vulgar Latin *potēre, to be able, from potis, able, powerful.]

power (noun)

power, potency, mightiness, greatness
prepotency, prevalence, predominance, superiority
omnipotence, almightiness, authority
control, sway, governance
moral power, ascendancy, influence
spiritual power, charisma, mana
witchcraft, sorcery
staying power, endurance, stability
driving force, motive
physical power, might, muscle, brute force or strength, right arm, right hand, strength
dint, effort, endeavor, exertion
force, compulsion
stress, strain, shear
weight, gravity
weight of numbers, greater number
manpower, personnel
position of power, position of strength, vantage point, advantage
validity, truth
cogency, emphasis, affirmation
extra power, overdrive

Other Forms
greatness: mightiness, might, strength, intensity, power, influence
numerical element: power, root, square root, cube root
strength: strength, might, potency, horsepower, HP, power
agency: force, strain, stress, play, power
influence: influence, capability, power, potency, potentiality, ability
style: literary style, command of language or idiom, raciness, power, vigor
vigor: power, strength, vitality, drive, force, forcefulness, oomph, go, get-up-and-go, energy
eloquence: power of speech, power, vigor
instrumentality: efficacy, power
means: power, capacity, ability
utility: virtue, function, capacity, potency, clout, power
authority: authority, power
brute force: rule of might, big battalions, gunboat diplomacy, power
divine attribute: omnipotence, almightiness, power

power or sphere of influence (noun)

Occult and Magick

The word occult comes from the Latin word occultus (clandestine, hidden, secret), referring to “knowledge of the hidden”.[1] In the medical sense it is used to refer to a structure or process that is hidden, e.g. an “occult bleed”[2] may be one detected indirectly by the presence of otherwise unexplained anemia.

The word has many uses in the English language, popularly meaning “knowledge of the paranormal“, as opposed to “knowledge of the measurable“,[3][4] usually referred to as science. The term is sometimes popularly taken to mean “knowledge meant only for certain people” or “knowledge that must be kept hidden”, but for most practicing occultists it is simply the study of a deeper spiritual reality that extends beyond pure reason and the physical sciences.[5] The terms esoteric and arcane can have a very similar meaning, and the three terms are often interchangeable.[6][7]

The term occult is also used as a label given to a number of magical organizations or orders, the teachings and practices taught by them, and to a large body of current and historical literature and spiritual philosophy related to this subject.

Occultism

Reconstruction of the “Holy Table” as used by John Dee.

Occultism is the term used to describe the study of occult practices including (but not limited to) magicalchemyextra-sensory perceptionastrologyspiritualism, and divination. Interpretation of occultism and its concepts can be found in the belief structures of religions such as GnosticismHermeticismTheosophyWiccaThelemaSatanism, and Neopaganism.[8] A broad definition is offered by Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke:

OCCULTISM has its basis in a religious way of thinking, the roots of which stretch back into antiquity and which may be described as the Western esoteric tradition. Its principal ingredients have been identified as Gnosticism, the Hermetic treatises on alchemy and magic, Neo-Platonism, and the Kabbalah, all originating in the eastern Mediterranean area during the first few centuries AD.[9]

From the 15th to 17th century, these ideas that are alternatively described as Western esotericism, which had a revival from about 1770 onwards, due to a renewed desire for mystery, an interest in the Middle Ages and a romantic “reaction to the rationalistEnlightenment.”[10] Alchemy was common among highly important seventeenth-century scientists, such as Isaac Newton,[11] and Gottfried Leibniz.[12] Newton was even accused of introducing occult agencies into natural science when he postulated gravityas a force capable of acting over vast distances.[13] “By the eighteenth century these unorthodox religious and philosophical concerns were well defined as ‘occult’, inasmuch as they lay on the outermost fringe of accepted forms of knowledge and discourse,”[10] They were, however, preserved by antiquarians and mystics.

Based on his research into the modern German occult revival (1890–1910), Goodrick-Clarke puts forward a thesis on the driving force behind occultism. Behind its many varied forms apparently lies a uniform function, “a strong desire to reconcile the findings of modern natural science with a religious view that could restore man to a position of centrality and dignity in the universe.[14] Since that time many authors have emphasized a syncretic approach by drawing parallels between different disciplines.[15]

Direct insight into our perception of the occult does not usually consist of access to physically measurable facts, but is arrived at through the mind or the spirit[verification needed]. The term can refer to mentalpsychological or spiritual training[verification needed]. Many occultists have studied science (perceiving science as an adjunct to alchemy) to add validity to occult knowledge in a day and age where the mystical can easily be undermined as flights of fancy. An oft-cited means of gaining insight into the occult is the use of a focus; a physical object, a ritualistic action (for example, meditation or chanting), or a medium in which one becomes wholly immersed. These are just a few examples of the vast and numerous avenues that can be explored.

Science and the occult

To the occultist, occultism is conceived of as the study of the inner nature of things, as opposed to the outer characteristics that are studied by science. The German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer designates this “inner nature” with the term Will, and suggests that science and mathematics are unable to penetrate beyond the relationship between one thing and another in order to explain the “inner nature” of the thing itself, independent of any external causal relationships with other “things”.[16][original research?] Schopenhauer also points towards this inherently relativistic nature of mathematics and conventional science in his formulation of the ‘World as Will’. By defining a thing solely in terms of its external relationships or effects we only find its external, or explicit nature. Occultism, on the other hand, is concerned with the nature of the “thing-in-itself“. This is often accomplished through direct perceptual awareness, known as mysticism.

From the scientific perspective, occultism is regarded as unscientific as it does not make use of the scientific method (that is, observation and experimentation) to obtain facts.

Occult qualities

Occult qualities are properties that have no rational explanation. In the Middle Agesmagnetism was sometimes called an occult quality.[17] Newton’s contemporaries severely critiqued his theory that gravity was effected through “action at a distance” as occult.[18]

Religion and the occult

Some religious denominations view the occult as being anything supernatural or paranormal which is not achieved by or through God (as defined by those religious denominations), and is therefore the work of an opposing and malevolent entity. The word has negative connotations for many people, and while certain practices considered by some to be “occult” are also found within mainstream religions, in this context the term “occult” is rarely used and is sometimes substituted with “esoteric”.

Religious Jewish views

In Rabbinic Judaism, an entire body of literature, collectively known as Kabbalah has been dedicated to the content eventually defined by some as occult science. The Kabbalah includes the tracts named Sefer YetzirahThe ZoharPardes Rimonim, and Eitz Chaim. For a more exhaustive look at these subjects, see Kabbalah.

Though there is a popular myth that one must be a 40 year old Jewish man, and learned in the Talmud before one is allowed to delve into Kabbalah, Chaim Vital says exactly the opposite in his introduction to Eitz Chaim. There he argues that it is incumbent on everyone to learn Kabbalah – even those who are unable to understand the Talmud. Further, the father of the Lurianic School of Kabbalah, Isaac Luria (known as the Ari HaKadosh, or the Holy Lion) was not yet 40 years old when he passed away.

Christian views

Christian authorities have generally regarded occultism as heretical whenever they met this: from early Christian times, in the form of gnosticism, to late Renaissance times, in the form of various occult philosophies.[19] Though there is a Christian occult tradition that goes back at least to Renaissance times, when Marsilio Ficino developed a Christian Hermeticism and Pico della Mirandola developed a Christian form of Kabbalism,[20] mainstream institutional Christianity has always resisted occult influences, which are:[21]

  • monistic in contrast to Christian dualistic beliefs of a separation between body and spirit;
  • generally not monotheistic, frequently asserting a gradation of human souls between mortals and God; and
  • sometimes not even theistic in character.

Furthermore, there are heterodox branches of Esoteric Christianity that practice divination, blessings, or appealing to angels for certain intervention, which they view as perfectly righteous, often supportable by gospel (for instance, claiming that the old commandment against divination was superseded by Christ’s birth, and noting that the Magi used astrology to locate Bethlehem). Rosicrucianism, one of the most celebrated of Christianity’s mystical offshoots, has lent aspects of its philosophy to most Christian-based occultism since the 17th century.

Hindu views

Occult concepts have existed in Hinduism from the time of vedas and it is ingrained into the Hindu thought.The Atharva Veda contains a number occult practices. They were supposed to be used to protect oneself from evil.

Tantra, originating in India, includes amongst its various branches a variety of ritualistic practices ranging from visualisation exercises and the chanting of mantras to elaborate rituals.

There a hundreds of mystic amulets or Yantra in Hinduism for various deities.

See also

Occult portal

Occult Power and Manifestation

To bring into existence, come into being,  make real in material or corporeal form through magickal and ritualistic powers etc. Imagination made manifest into reality in or of any form.

OCCULT:  Of, relating to, or dealing with supernatural influences or phenomena

The following lists are partial compilations of various occult activities and manifestations, many of which may not be reported by counselees, explored by counselors, or seen by either as having any possible correlation.  Connections do exist, however, between many activities which are, or may be, points of contact or entanglement with demonic entities, and many experiences that are, or may be, manifestations of demonic “attachments,” or demonically-mediated phenomena, influence, or oppression.

For example, some of the experiences or behavioral manifestations noted in this survey may “fit” several categories, such as demonic “attachments,”  oppression, or influence; various types of dissociation, including demonically-mediated dissociation (DMD); manifestations of alter personalities; indications of physical disease; or signs of “mental illness”, unrelated to spiritual factors.  Referrals for other interventions may be necessary and should be made, if indicated.

It is suggested the counselor administer these surveys by incorporating them into a comprehensive interview, with follow-up where indicated for any clarification needed.  It should be noted, however, such an exploration, when undertaken by a Bible-believing Christian who is experienced in or sensitive to spiritual realities and spiritual warfare, may activate various manifestations found in Part I.  Spiritual intervention may be required immediately.

In addition, presentation of all the items during one interview may result in some counselees feeling overwhelmed.  Similar explorations conducted by counselors who do not believe in these realities will probably not stir the entities, who, if present, can create or mediate these manifestations. The author is not responsible for the manner in which the survey is used, hypotheses and conclusions resulting from its use, or any action or event arising from its use.

CAUTION: Content in this web site has been known to excite anti-Christian defense attorneys, defense “experts,” and others who are blind to spiritual realities, grossly intolerant of the Bible and those who know it is true, and who, through their various comments and actions, clearly imply Jesus Himself was/is a liar and a lunatic since He dealt with the spiritual entities referenced in this site. Such intolerance has led to prolonged attacks on something those individuals clearly do not understand, and do not understand they do not understand, since those things are spiritually discerned, and not understood through the intellect or “science.” Their blindness has led to numerous attacks on the author of this site, including being told after the discovery of this site his “credibility” had been “damaged,” and this author has been subjected to gross discriminatory actions against him at work as a result. “Thought police” have subjected him to attempts to undermine his First Amendment right to Freedom of Speech through suggestions he should modify the content of this site, and his complaints to EEOC and the Kansas Human Rights Commission have been rejected as being unworthy of merit, despite the clear, grossly inappropriate, violations cited in communication with those groups. Belief in God, the Bible, and the realities found in this site will likely subject others to similar treatment by those who are Jesusphobic, and who claim to be “tolerant,” although their actions give them away. On the other hand, I thank God that He can use unbelievers and those hostile to the Bible and the truth of the Gospel to elicit responses from this author regarding these matters; responses that would not otherwise be heard in court testimony or some other locations. Perhaps some spiritual eyes wil be opened as a result, and the Gospel, which has always flourished and has been spread as a result of persecution and attack, will be spread even further.

influence: power or sphere of influence, orbit

in·flu·ence

in·flu·ence (ĭnʹfl-əns) noun
Abbr. infl.

1.     A power affecting a person, thing, or course of events, especially one that operates without any direct or apparent effort: relaxed under the influence of the music; the influence of television on modern life.

2.     a. Power to sway or affect based on prestige, wealth, ability, or position: used her parent’s influence to get the job. b. One exercising such power: My parents considered my friend to be a bad influence on me. c. An effect or change produced by such power.

3.     a. A determining factor believed by some to affect individual tendencies and characteristics understood to be caused by the positions of the stars and planets at the time of one’s birth. b. Factors believed to be caused by the changing positions of the stars and planets in relation to those positions at the time of one’s birth.
verb, transitive
in·flu·enced, in·flu·enc·ing, in·flu·enc·es

1.     To produce an effect on by imperceptible or intangible means; sway.

2.     To affect the nature, development, or condition of; modify. See synonyms at affect1.

idiom.
under the influence
Intoxicated, especially with alcohol.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin īnfluentia, influx, from Latin īnfluēns, īnfluent- present participle of īnfluere, to flow in : in-, in. See in-2 + fluere, to flow.]

– inʹflu·ence·a·ble adjective
– inʹflu·enc·er noun

influence (noun)

influence, capability, power, potency, potentiality, ability
prevalence, predominance, superiority
mightiness, magnitude, greatness, importance
upper hand, deciding vote, final say
vantage point, footing, hold, grip
leverage, sway, scope
purchase, pivot
clout, weight, pressure
pull, drag, magnetism, attraction
counterattraction, repulsion, counteraction
thrust, drive, get-up-and-go, propulsion
impact, impulse
leaven, contagion, infection
atmosphere, climate, circumstance
atavism, telegony, heredity
occult influence, mana, magic, spell, sorcery
cosmic forces or powers, stars, astrology, horoscope, heavens, destiny, fate
fascination, hypnotism, mesmerism
evil influence, curse, ruin, hex, whammy, double whammy, jinx, bane
emotion, impulse, impression, feeling, affections
suasion, persuasion, insinuation, suggestion, impulsion, inspiration, motive
personality, je ne sais quoi, charisma, leadership, credit, repute, prestige
hegemony, ascendancy, domination, tyranny, authority
sway, control, dominance, reign, governance
power or sphere of influence, orbit
factor, contributing factor, vital role, leading part, cause
indirect influence, patronage, interest, favor, pull, friend in high places, string-pulling, aid
strings, lever, tool
secret influence, hand that rocks the cradle, woman behind the man, power behind the throne, kingmaker, power broker, latency
force, force to be reckoned with
lobby, pressure group, vested interest, inducement
manipulator, mover, maneuverer, motivator
person of influence, dignitary, luminary, king of the hill, big gun, top gun, top cat, big guys, big kahuna, big shot, bigwig
global, international or multinational company, superpower
Big Brother, powers that be, the Establishment, government

Other Forms
relativeness: governing relation, influence
greatness: mightiness, might, strength, intensity, power, influence
superiority: ascendancy, domination, predominance, hegemony, influence
component: element, factor, influence
conversion: brainwashing, influence
causation: inspiration, influence
cause: hidden hand, hidden cause, power behind the throne, undercurrents, influence
effect: moral effect, influence
power: moral power, ascendancy, influence
agency: interaction, interworking, influence
tendency: climate, influence
transference: contagion, infection, contamination, influence
latency: manipulator, puppeteer, hidden hand, wire-puller, strings, friends in high places, power behind the throne, éminence grise, influence
inducement: lobbying, influence
motivator: manipulator, manager, wirepuller, puppet master, influence
instrumentality: pressure, influence
importance: influence, prestige
bigwig: superpower, influence
improvement: good influence, the making of, influence
troublemaker: hidden hand, influence
action: force, pressure, influence
director: hidden hand, influence
cunning: backroom influence, influence
aid: patronage, auspices, sponsorship, countenance, suffrage, favor, protection, influence
authority: vicarious authority, power behind the throne, influence
excitation: impression, image, impact, influence
prestige: name to conjure with, influence
sorcery: sympathetic magic, influence, inducement
spell: evil eye, whammy, jinx, hex, influence

an·i·ma·tion

an·i·ma·tion (ăn´ə-māʹshən) noun

1.     The act, process, or result of imparting life, interest, spirit, motion, or activity.

2.     The quality or condition of being alive, active, spirited, or vigorous.

3.     a. The art or process of preparing animated cartoons. b. An animated cartoon.

life (noun)

life, living, being alive, animate existence, being, existence
the living, living and breathing world
living being, being, soul, spirit
plant life, vegetable life
animal life, animality
human life, humankind
gift of life, birth, nativity, origin
new birth, rejuvenation, revivification, renaissance, revival
life to come, the hereafter, future state
immortal life, heaven
vivification, vitalization, animation
vitality, vital force, vital principle, élan vital, life force
soul, spirit
beating heart, strong pulse
will to live, hold on life, survival, cat’s nine lives, longevity, long duration
animal spirits, liveliness, animation, moral sensibility
wind, breath, breathing, respiration
vital air, breath of life, breath of one’s nostrils
lifeblood, essential part
vital spark, vital flame
heart, artery
vital necessity, nourishment, staff of life, food
biological function, parenthood, motherhood, fatherhood, propagation
sex, sexual activity, coition
living matter, protoplasm, bioplasm, ectoplasm, tissue, living tissue
macromolecule, bioplast
cell, unicellular organism, organism
cooperative living, symbiosis, association
life-support system
lifetime, one’s born days
life expectancy, life span, life cycle
capacity for life, survivability, viability, viableness, possibility

Other Forms
existence: subsistence, life
substance: body, flesh and blood, living matter, life
essential part: life, lifeblood, sap
time: the whole time, the entire period, life, lifetime
period: life, lifetime, life sentence
affairs: world, life, situation, circumstance
vitality: vim, vigor, liveliness, life
vigorousness: vigorousness, lustiness, energy, vigor, life, activity
blood: lifeblood, life
organism: living matter, life
biography: life, curriculum vitae, cv, résumé, life story or history
vocation: life, lifestyle, walk of life, career, chosen career, labor of love, self-imposed task, voluntary work
activity: life, stir, motion
restlessness: vivacity, spirit, animation, liveliness, vitality, life
cheerfulness: vitality, spirits, animal spirits, high spirits, youthful high spirits, joie de vivre, life

dem·i·urge

dem·i·urge (dĕmʹē-ûrj´) noun

1.     A powerful creative force or personality.

2.     A public magistrate in some ancient Greek states.

3.     Demiurge A deity in Gnosticism, Manicheeism, and other religions who creates the material world and is sometimes viewed as the originator of evil.

4.     Demiurge A Platonic deity who orders or fashions the material world out of chaos.

[Late Latin dēmiurgus, from Greek dēmiourgos, artisan : dēmios, public (from dēmos, people) + ergos, worker (from ergon, work).]

– dem´i·urʹgeous (-ûrʹjəs) or dem´i·urʹgic (-jĭk), dem´i·urʹgi·cal (-jĭ-kəl) adjective
– dem´i·urʹgi·cal·ly adverb

 

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